Appendix C. Mounting/Unmounting CD-ROMs

This appendix provides system-specific information on mounting and unmounting CD-ROMs. Examples of the following are provided:

Mounting Local CD-ROMs

The following sections provide examples of how to mount CD-ROMs on the specified platforms.

AIX Systems

On AIX systems, the following steps mount a CD-ROM from /dev/cd0 onto mount point /usr/cdrom:

  1. Create the mount point if it does not exist:

    mkdir /usr/cdrom

  2. Use the mount command to mount the device:

    mount -v cdrfs -o ro /dev/cd0 /usr/cdrom

To simplify the mount command, add the relevant information to the /etc/filesystems file. In this example, you would add the following:

/usr/cdrom:
  dev      = /dev/cd0
  vfs      = cdrfs
  mount    = false
  options  = ro
  account  = false

If you add this information to the file, the following command mounts the CD-ROM:

mount /usr/cdrom

HP-UX Systems

On HP-UX systems, the following steps mount a CD-ROM drive connected as device 2 on SCSI controller 0 (device /dev/dsk/c201d2s0) onto mount point /usr/cdrom.

  1. Create the mount point if it does not exist:

    mkdir /usr/cdrom

  2. Use the mount(1M) command to mount the device:

    mount -t cdfs -o ro /dev/dsk/c201d2s0 /usr/cdrom

This example is taken from a series 700 workstation with a CD-ROM drive configured at SCSI target 2. Other HP-UX systems may require different device entries.

To simplify the mount command, add the relevant information to the /etc/checklist file. In this example, you would add the following:

/dev/dsk/c201d2s0 /usr/cdrom cdfs ro 0 0 0

If you add this information to the file, the following command mounts the CD-ROM:

mount /usr/cdrom

IRIX Systems

The IRIX system provides the mediad(1M) daemon, which monitors the removable media devices on a system. For information about configuring the daemon to monitor CD-ROM devices and mount the medium automatically, see the mediad(1M) man page.


Note: : When mounting a CD-ROM on a Silicon Graphics system, you must specify the notranslate option on the mount(1M) command. If you omit this option, directory names will be translated into lowercase, and the NQE software will not load properly.

By default, mediad runs and mounts CD-ROM medium on the /CDROM file system; if mediad has been disabled, the following steps manually mount a CD-ROM drive connected as device 4 on SCSI controller 0.

  1. Create the mount point if it does not exist:

    mkdir /usr/cdrom

  2. Use the mount(1M) command to mount the device:

    mount -t iso9660 -o notranslate,ro /dev/scsi/sc0d4l0 /usr/cdromeoe2.sw.cdrom

    eoe2.sw.cdrom must be installed in order to use the iso9660 file system type.

To simplify the mount command, add the relevant information to the /etc/fstab file. In this example, you would add the following:

/dev/scsi/sc0d4l0  /usr/cdrom  iso9660  notranslate,ro  0  0

If you add this information to the file, the following command mounts the CD-ROM:

mount /usr/cdrom

Digital UNIX Systems

On Digital UNIX systems, the following steps mount a CD-ROM from device /dev/rz4c onto mount point /usr/cdrom.

  1. Create the mount point if it does not exist:

    mkdir /usr/cdrom

  2. Use the mount(1M) command to mount the device:

    mount -t cdfs -o ro,nodefperm /dev/rz4c /usr/cdrom

To simplify the mount command, add the relevant information to the /etc/fstab file. In this example, you would add the following:

/dev/rz4c  /usr/cdrom  cdfs  ro,nodefperm  0  0

If you add this information to the file, the following command mounts the CD-ROM:

mount /usr/cdrom

Solaris Systems

On Solaris systems, the Volume Management daemon, vold(1M), automatically mounts the CD-ROM when it is inserted at mount point /cdrom/cdrom0. Mount commands are not necessary. After you insert the CD-ROM, you can access it by using the /cdrom/cdrom0 mount point.

By default, vold(1M) is running; if it has been disabled, the following steps mount a CD-ROM drive connected as device 6 on SCSI controller 0.

  1. Create the mount point if it does not exist:

    mkdir /usr/cdrom

  2. Use the mount(1M) command to mount the device:

    mount -F hsfs -o ro /dev/dsk/c0t6d0s0 /usr/cdrom

If vold(1M) is not running on your system, consult the hsfs(7) and mount(1M) man pages for further information on mounting the CD-ROM.

To simplify the mount command, add the relevant information to the /etc/vfstab file. In this example, you would add the following:

/dev/dsk/c0t6d0s0  /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0s0  /usr/cdrom  hsfs  -  no  ro

If you add this information to the file, the following command mounts the CD-ROM:

mount /usr/cdrom

Unmounting (Ejecting) Local CD-ROMs

The following sections provide examples of how to unmount CD-ROMs on the specified platforms.

AIX Systems

To eject the CD-ROM medium, use the umount(1M) command to unmount it, as follows:

umount /usr/cdrom

After you have issued the command, press the eject button on the drive. The CD-ROM will not eject until you unmount the medium.

HP-UX Systems

To eject the CD-ROM medium, use the umount(1M) command to unmount it, as follows:

umount /usr/cdrom

After you have issued the command, press the eject button on the drive. The CD-ROM will not eject until you unmount the medium.

IRIX Systems

To eject a CD-ROM, floppy disk, or tape, use the eject(1) command. If the floppy disk or CD-ROM is mounted, eject(1) will try to unmount it before it ejects the medium.

You also can eject the medium manually by pressing the eject button on the drive after you unmount it.

Digital UNIX Systems

To eject the CD-ROM medium, use the umount(1M) command to unmount it, as follows:

umount /usr/cdrom

After you have issued the command, press the eject button on the drive. The CD-ROM will not eject until you unmount the medium.

Solaris Systems

To eject a CD-ROM, floppy disk, or tape, use the eject(1) command. If the floppy disk or CD-ROM is mounted, eject(1) will try to unmount it before it ejects the medium.

You also can eject the medium manually by pressing the eject button on the drive after you unmount it.

Exporting and Mounting CD-ROMs over NFS

Sometimes it may be desirable to install the NQE software on a system that does not have a CD-ROM drive. To do this, you can mount the CD-ROM on a system that has a CD-ROM drive and use NFS to export the CD-ROM file system to the system without the CD-ROM drive. Reusing the CD-ROM medium involves the following:

  • NFS exporting and mounting of the CD-ROM file system

  • Installing NQE as described in this publication.

You must mount the file system to allow set UID (suid) execution. This is done on the origin host (the NFS client), either in the mount command or in the automounter map files if you are using automount.

Exporting File Systems

To make a mounted CD-ROM file system available to other workstations, you first must verify that at least one nfsd (1M or 8) daemon is running on the NFS server. The nfsd daemon runs on a server machine to service NFS requests from client machines. The NFS load on your NFS server will dictate the number of nfsd daemons required on that host, but at least one nfsd daemon must be running to export file systems over NFS.

Different systems have different procedures for exporting file systems. The following sections describe how it is accomplished on supported NQE platforms.

Exporting on AIX, HP-UX, and IRIX,

On AIX, HP-UX, and IRIX platforms, file systems are exported by editing the /etc/exports file and then executing the exportfs command. Consult the man pages for the following systems:

Platform 

Man pages

AIX, HP-UX, and IRIX 

exports(4), exportfs(1M), and showmount(1M)

The following procedure demonstrates how to export the local file system /usr/cdrom from host hosta to hosts hostb and hostc.

  1. Edit /etc/exports. Its content in this example would include the following line:

    /usr/cdrom hostb:hostc
  2. Export the new file system, as follows:

    # exportfs /usr/cdrom
  3. Verify that the file system is exported by examining the /etc/xtab file. The showmount command displays only the name of the exported file system, not the options with which it was exported, as shown in the following example:

    # cat /etc/xtab
    /usr/cdrom hostb:hostc
    # showmount -e hosta
    /usr/cdrom

Exporting on Digital UNIX

On Digital UNIX platforms, file systems are exported by editing the /etc/exports file and then executing the mountd(8) command. Man pages for exports(4) and mountd(8) are available.

The following procedure demonstrates how to export the local file system /usr/cdrom from host hostd to hosts hostb and hostc.

  1. Edit /etc/exports. Its content in this example would include the following line:

    /usr/cdrom hostb hostc

    The list of host names is separated by white space, not with commas or colons.

  2. Export the new file system, as follows:

    # exportfs /usr/cdrom
  3. Verify that the file system is exported. Because no /etc/xtab file exists, use the showmount(8) command as follows (the options are not visible):

    # showmount -e hostd
    Exports list on hostd:
    usr/cdrom        hostb,hostc

Exporting on Solaris

On Solaris platforms, file systems are exported by editing the /etc/dfs/dfstab file and then executing the share or shareall(1M) command. Man pages for share(1M), shareall (1M), showmount(1M), and dfstab(4) are available. The dfstab file contains share(1M) commands for automatic execution when the system boots and goes into multiuser mode.

The following procedure demonstrates how to export local file system /usr/cdrom from host hostc to hosts hostb and hosta.

  1. Edit /etc/dfs/dfstab. Its content in this example would include the following line:

    share -F nfs -o hostb:hosta /usr/cdrom
  2. Export the new file system by executing either the share or shareall command:

    # shareall
  3. Verify that the file system is exported either by examining the /etc/dfs/sharetab file or by executing the showmount(1M) command.

Mounting File Systems

All of the supported NQE workstation platforms allow set UID (suid) execution upon NFS-mounted file systems by default, which lets you set the user ID upon execution of set UID executable files. If a file system is mounted nosuid , it will not allow execution of set UID programs by way of that mount.

The following procedure demonstrates how to mount the remote file system /usr/cdrom from host hosta on host hostb at /tmp/cdrom with set UID execution allowed.

  1. Create the local mount point, as follows:

    # mkdir -p /tmp/cdrom
  2. Execute the mount command.

    Options must precede the remote file system name and the local mount point name, as follows:

    # mount -o suid hosta:/usr/cdrom /tmp/cdrom

    The -o suid option is not required, because this is the default on all supported workstation platforms.

    On AIX platforms, you must specify the target host, the local directory, and the target directory, as follows:

    # mount -ntarget_host /usr/craysoft /tmp/craysoft

The default information for file systems (both local and remote) resides in different places on different systems, as shown in Table C-1. For more information on configuring the appropriate files, see the system-specific man pages and documentation.

Table C-1. File System Information

Platform

File

Man page

AIX

/etc/filesystems

filesystems(4)

HP-UX

/etc/checklist

checklist(4)

IRIX

/etc/fstab

fstab(4)

Digital UNIX

/etc/fstab

fstab(4)

Solaris

/etc/vfstab

vfstab(4)

After you have exported and mounted the CD-ROM file system, install the software on the target host as described in this publication.